Expand Your eDiscovery Collection

Expand Your eDiscovery Collection

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Filtering a client’s social media posts on your own using slow internal search functions, screenshots and screen scraping can take days to produce a single piece of useful evidence. Most evidence collected via screenshots and scraping fail to provide defensible authenticity and may even violate certain websites Term of Use Agreements. Novara is able to search multiple social media account’s data, concurrently, and export defensible information on all of a plaintiff’s data. The data produced is authentic, native, and collected to be forensically compliant.

Best practices for expanding your collection and use of data include:

Direct Messages and Group Messages

Direct or group messages often contain crucial evidence in a case. Novara allows you to quickly search all of a plaintiff’s direct messages, in every platform, by keyword, by date range, and with filters. Novara also pulls conversations from blocked users and groups, even though the data may not show who the blocked user is. This is a powerful edge when vetting and producing an export,during the discovery process.

Public, Private, and Group Posts

These downloads include data on public posts by your client showing how their information is visible to other public users. Opposing counsel will most always attempt to collect public facing posts, comments, and likes.  By collecting these posts first, you can prepare for information opposing counsel may produce before it happens. 

Photos and Videos

Most photos and videos on social media accounts are still visible even with advanced privacy settings. If your client has any photo albums, or videos on their accounts, it’s best to proactively screen and select responsive results and associated comments. Photos and videos that appear in Novara are best discovered and searched using a location name, event name, or narrowing the date range to return less data. Communicate with your plaintiff to change the privacy settings of their photos when you begin collections to prevent opposing counsel from finding photos first


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